The Egg Factor and Haemochromatosis

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I love eggs! I mean, I really love eggs – as an omelette, scrambled, poached, boiled or fried sunny side up. No weekend in our house would be complete without a breakfast of eggs on wholegrain toast, whilst reading the paper and sipping on freshly made coffee. Life is good!

Imagine my absolute delight, therefore, when I discovered that whilst rich in iron and therefore on face value a “no-no” for anyone with haemochromatosis, eggs actually work to impair iron absorption due to the presence of a protein called phosvitin. In fact, research has shown that one boiled egg can actually decrease iron absorption by as much as 28%.

Eggs are also a great source of Zinc, which is vital for the health of our immune system, and Vitamin D, which aids calcium absorption and promotes the healthy development of bones and teeth. Eggs also contain Tryptophan, an essential amino acid which produces serotonin and assists with mental health and fatigue. In other words, eggs are a feel good food and help us stay calm and happy.

One of my favourite meals is Spanish Eggs. There are so many versions of this one pot wonder, but this is my interpretation.  I usually cook this dish when I’m home alone and scratching for a quick and nutritious dinner (it can be on the table in less than 30 minutes), however it would of course be equally scrumptious for breakfast, brunch or lunch.

The other key ingredients in this dish – tomatoes and capsicums (or peppers, depending on which part of the world you come from) – are marginally high in iron, however they are also high in beta carotene which aids in the production of Vitamin A by the body and is also a powerful anti oxidant – for those reasons alone tomatoes and capsicums shouldn’t be omitted from our diet.

I love to liberally douse my Spanish Eggs in coriander (cilantro), which has cleansing, healing and nutritive qualities and is a very effective heavy metal chelator, helping to remove iron from the body.

How do you like your eggs?

Spicy Spanish Eggs

Ingredients:

I tbsp oil

1 brown onion, chopped

½ red and ½ green capsicum, de-seeded and diced into large pieces

1 red chilli, de-seeded and finely chopped

1 garlic clove, crushed

400g canned tomatoes (I used cherry tomatoes)

1 small bunch of coriander, stalks and leaves chopped separately

2 large free range eggs (for 1 person, or 4 eggs to serve 2)

Salt and pepper to taste

Method:

  1. Heat oil in a frypan and add the onions, capsicum, chilli, garlic and coriander stalks. Cook gently for 5 minutes or until soft. Add salt at this stage to prevent the onion and garlic from burning.
  2. Pour in the tomatoes with the juice. Bring to a simmer and bubble for 8 minutes, or until the sauce thickens and the liquid is reduced. Add ½ of the coriander leaves.
  3. Using the back of a wooden spoon, part the mixture to make two hollows.
  4. Break an egg into each hollow and cover with a lid.
  5. Cook gently until the eggs are set. Season to taste.
  6. Sprinkle with the remaining coriander and serve with crusty wholegrain toast.

One response to “The Egg Factor and Haemochromatosis”

  1. […] One of my favourite “go to” weekend breakfasts is an omelette.  As you know, I just love eggs and lucky for me they actually work to impair iron absorption due to the presence of a protein called phosvitin. In fact, research has shown that one boiled egg can actually decrease iron absorption by as much as 28%.  If you want to know more about the benefits of eggs for people with haemochromatosis, you can read my post on the Egg Factor here. […]